NCA's generous donation are a big hit in Haiti Humanitarian Effort

May 2011 – Overlake Hospitals Dr. Bill Crenshaw and Senior Systems Analyst Dean Lee and NCA's generous donation are a big hit in Haiti Humanitarian Effort.

In mid-May Dr. Bill Crenshaw (OIA/WIS Interventional Radiologist) returned to Haiti for the fourth time to help the people ravished by the 2010 hurricane that left 1,000,000 people dead, injured, or homeless. Based out of the 1 year old Hospital Bernard MevsMedishare Facility in Port-Au-Prince, Dr. Crenshaw has seen the hospital grow into an 80 bed hospital that has treated 85,000 patients in its 1st year of existence and is the only critical care facility in Haiti.

During Dr. Crenshaw's first two trips to Haiti, he served as the Chief Medical Officer for the Medishare facility. On his 3rd trip, he accepted a position as the Director of Medical Imaging, a daunting task as the hospital relies completely on equipment donated through its Endowment Foundation and continues with that responsibility today.

In addition to their time and commitment, this year Dr. Crenshaw and his wife donated a SonoSite Ultrasound System to the hospital, greatly enhancing the facilities' diagnostic capabilities.

Another major advancement at the hospital occurred with the significant help of Dean Lee, Senior Systems Analyst, Overlake Hospital. Mr. Lee went to Haiti to assist setting up the hospital network to get the new GE CT system up and running.

That is where Network Computing Architects, Inc., (NCA) (http://www.ncanet.com/), a Bellevue based systems integrator, stepped in and was able to work with Dean Lee and the team at Overlake to assist in supplying a new modern network. This donation would not only allow the medical facility to deploy the newer state of the art equipment, but it also allows for greater reliability and capacity for critical services. After Overlake's initial conversations with NCA regarding their requirements, NCA was able to design and deliver a complete network, including spares, ahead of Dean's arrival in Haiti.

Along the way Dr. Crenshaw and Dean met President Michel Martelly of Haiti, First Lady Sophia Martelly, and Singer Wyclef Jean (who's Yele Haiti charity is a major contributor to the Medishare facility, including the 16 slice CT scanner). They were able to see first hand the amazing resilience and courage of the Haitian people. Dean's success in setting up the PACS system and getting the CT up and running made him "nothing short of a rock star" in the eyes of the staff and patients at the hospital, said Dr. Crenshaw.

Getting the first publically owned CT in Haiti up and running was a task that required just short of a miracle. The CT scanner is situated in a trailer that had neither power or wiring - resulting in a significant amount of very large extension cords and crossed fingers. Due to Dr. Crenshaw and Dean's diligence and perseverance, the entire system is up and running and the people of Haiti are able to get medical imaging that was previously unavailable to them.

The CT scanner will help treat the five major preventable causes of death in Haiti, which are: trauma, heart attack, stroke, maternal emergencies and burns. The scanner is connected to Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami and this will assist in providing near instantaneous reading of the scans. This desperately needed technology will be integrated into Project Medishare's training and education program for Haitian healthcare workers.

President Michel Martelly of Haiti and singer, Wyclef Jean

As quoted in the Port-Au-Prince newspaper in May "Receiving this CT scanner and housing it at Hospital Bernard Mevs Project Medishare has many benefits. The staff will be able to treat pa-tients much faster as there will no longer be a need to transfer anyone for scans. If a patient has had an aneurysm, the CT Scanner will show the size of it and if it is operable. Dr. Bill Crenshaw and Dean Lee donated IV Contrast that will show vessels during the scans. With IV contrast, the hospital will be able to assess the aorta and pulmonary arteries. Using IV contrast in patients being scanned will allow the hospital to get oncology imaging as well as imaging of patients with trauma and acute abdominal pain."

As Physical Therapist Gina Epifano stated earlier this year "There's something about Haiti that gets into your heart and just won't go away. It's impossible to meet the people and not leave a piece of your heart behind. The only solution I have found is to keep going back." Both Dean and Dr. Crenshaw concur and are looking forward to returning to Haiti later this year to continue the work started in May.

Additional information on the hospital, on Medishare, and on Dr. Barth Greene, Founder of Medishare can be found at www.projectmedishare.org/photo-gallery/hospital-bernard-mevs-project-medishare/ President Martelly cuts the ribbon to the new CT Suite Dr. Crenshaw with singer and philanthropist Wyclef Jean.